Category Archives: Cotignac

Cotignac is an idyllic village in the South of France, and the inspiration behind this website. Feel free to visit these official French websites too:

Cotignac Tourist Office
Cotignac Town Hall (Mairie)

Bus schedules from Cotignac to Brignoles and Nice aeroport

Have you ever needed to take the bus to or from the aeroport to our village of Cotignac? You are not alone. Although time consuming and not always reliable, there are ways of getting to and from the aeroports (Nice and Marseille) by way of public bus via Brignoles, the bus depot in the main square across from the Post office. Brignoles is our nearest “big town”. From Cotignac you can catch the bus at the new stop that is now across from the Pharmacy and in front of Coti Brico on the D13. You’ll need to get off and transfer to another bus in Brignoles which will take you to the aeroports. To Nice they are more direct but to Marseille they go through Aix-en-Provence so they take more time. Bus schedules change frequently so if you understand French it’s always a good idea to confirm either by phone (08 09 400 415) or on the website info-ler.fr for the Brignoles-Nice-Marseilles lines run by ZOU! or for the Cotignac – Brignoles line contact the tourist office in Cotignac ( 04 94 04 61 87 ). If you simply wish to know the bus schedule between Cotignac and Nice aeroport (via Brignoles), read on.

From Cotignac buses to Brignoles run daily EXCEPT on Sundays. Departure times: 6am, 8:15am, and 1:40pm. The bus arrives in Brignoles at 6:50am, 9:10am, and 2:30pm. Please note that the earliest morning buses on weekdays from Cotignac are quite full with school kids.

From Brignoles to Nice aeroport buses depart at 10:05am, 12:20pm, 2:30pm and 6:45pm. Arriving in Nice at 11:35am, 2:30am, 4:45pm and 8:35pm.

From Nice aeroport to Brignoles bueses depart from Terminal 1 at 8am, 12:15pm, and 5:45pm. Arriving in Brignoles at 9:55am, 2:30pm, and 7:30pm.

From Brignoles to Cotignac buses depart Brignoles at 8:30am, 12pm, 5:10pm and 7:10pm. Arriving in Cotignac at 9:05am, 12:55pm, 5:50pm and 7:55pm.

But if you are able to hire a car from the aeroport I do recommend doing this as it gives you a lot more freedom to get around to places without hassle, albeit hitting your wallet on the deeper side. On the otherhand if you prefer not to drive yourself, there are also taxis and private shuttle services. 1) Moov83 www.moov83.com

2) Transports Clédana VTC 83 04 94 04 71 06 or 06 70 61 10 82

And should you ever be stuck somewhere you can always write to Susana here on Provence Living (by email provencelivingconsulting@gmail.com) and we will do our best to find a solution for you, even last minute 🙂

Luxury apartment for rent in Cotignac

This stunning and well appointed 2 level apartment is for rent from end of July 2019 until July 31st 2020. La Cotignanda has 3 bedrooms and an extra bed that can be closed off with curtains on the 2nd level. There is also a covered terrace with spectacular views of the rocher so when the village puts on its fireworks show (end of August and during the Christmas market), this is the VIP place to view it from! It would suit one or two couples for long term and for short term up to 6 persons (maximum capacity).

The apartment is fully furnished with good taste and is very clean (for non smokers only). There are two separate living areas, two bathrooms (with showers) and the best café and bakery are just forty steps away.

Views from the South facing windows are of the Place de la Mairie. All restaurants and shops are within short walking distance. The town hall is located next door. Bed and bath linens 100 per cent cotton, the kitchen is fully equipped with dishwasher, toaster, oven, etc, and there is a small room upstairs for the washing machine. Private rental with no agencies involved. Unfortunately due to stair access and uneven stairs in the apartment this rental is not suitable for young children nor the disabled.

Rental Price Guide (N.B. long term rental is also available from July 24th 2019, please contact the owner if the dates do not suit you, for a discounted rate at 3 months’ minimum stay):
Dates available in 2019 and 2020:

July 22nd – 29th 2019 (one week minimum) at 950 euros (includes bills*)

July 29th – September 2nd (one week minimum) at 950 euros (includes bills)

September 2nd – October 1st (one month minimum) at 2,000 euros (plus bills)

October 1st 2019 – June 29th 2020 (3 months’ minimum) at 1,600 euros (plus bills)

June 29th 2020 – July 27th 2020 (one week minimum) at 950 euros (plus bills)

*bills: electricity and water – cost depends on use

All bookings are subject to a cleaning charge of 65 euros at the end of the stay as well as a laundry charge of 10 euros per person. A security deposit of 500 euros for short term and 1,000 euros for long term rentals is requested, in cash, upon arrival and pending a property check, refunded at the end of the stay. All arrivals and departures must be made during the week with preference on Mondays. Weekend (Friday, Saturday, and Sunday) arrivals accepted only in exceptional cases where there are no other options, and at 50 euro additional charge. Thank you for your understanding.

To book, please contact the owner, Annee Bennison at: ann.bennison@icloud.com

Circuit walk Notre Dame to village

In addition to the popular “parcours de santĂ©” (which starts in the village and goes up past the Medieval forts, to the chapelle St Martin, and back through to the village via the Derroc and Trompines waterfall) there is a way to walk up to the Notre Dame de Graces (sanctuary frequented by over 100,000 Catholics per year!) without having to come back the same way. You can walk past the oratory on your left, the abandoned old house on your right, keep going about a kilometre then make a right into a small rocky path (so you should have some good walking shoes on) that will take you down into the Derroc neighbourhood of Cotignac. From there you’ll see the big waterfall on your left, cross the food bridge over the river that leads into the Cassole, then back into the village via the cemetery and notary offices. January and up to the month of May really is the best time for some nice walks around here in Cotignac. Enjoy the fresh air!

Cotignac’s FĂȘte du Coing (quince festival)

If you have never seen a quince before, you’ll be charmed by it’s pear-like appearance and delighted by the variety of cuisine it can be used in. From tarts to tortes and candy to jelly, this multi-purpose fruit goes a long way here in Provence. It’s Cotignac’s pride and joy and every year the village traditionally celebrates its heritage and harvest in October. This year the festival will took place on the 21st of October and if you missed it, do come back for it next year.

Continue reading Cotignac’s FĂȘte du Coing (quince festival)

The “Village du Rock” 2018 concert in Cotignac

The Cotignac resident music producer Mr Ossy Hoppe generously puts on these super-energised, dance-worthy shows with the showcase band “Five and the Red One” each Summer. This weekend marks their 10th year of putting on these concerts so it’s a big deal!! Opening the starring band is Johnny Gallagher, a singer-guitarist that’ll simply wow you.

The event attracts over 500 people from all over and many visitors came to Cotignac just to see the show.  A BIG thank you to Mr Ossy Hoppe who donates his profits from the concert to Cotignac’s local associations and is a very valuable appreciated philanthropist here. He’s also known in the music world as a producer of popular music (rock) and we are very lucky to have his know-how and expertise in our little village, jewel of the Var.

The concert is scheduled for Saturday, the 28th July from 6pm when you can buy German sausages in curry sauce with fries on the Cours Gambetta, just near Mirabeau Wine. You’ll also have a chance to win a signed guitar by the rock bands Toto and Deap Purple (who wouldn’t want that??) by purchasing raffle tickets. But the real action starts from around 8:30pm and goes ’til midnight.

Tip: if you want to find a good parking place nearby, come early.

 

 

The upcoming Cotignac Rosé festival 2018

It’s the now famous and very popular RosĂ© Festival here in Cotignac and if you are a fan of rosĂ© (um, who isn’t?) then it’s one party you do not want to miss. This year the fun takes place on the 18th of July, a Wednesday evening (to get over mid-week) and the “high” will take you straight to your weekend because you’ll have had a fabulous time and may even be a bit fatigued, lol. Mirabeau (mirabeauwine.com) hosts this event in collaboration with local producers who all bring out their top wines that make everyone seem to ooh and aah and dance the night away to DJ Nick Boot’s catchy tunes from the 80s all the way up to more recent funk and pop.

Last year’s fĂȘte saw Cotignac in grand party mode for a full seven hours. We loved all the pink-clad men and women, the groovy tunes and finger foods like burgers, crĂȘpes, Italian sandwiches, and many other yummy stands. For three euros anyone could buy a glass with their choice of rosĂ© wine (and get to take their souvenir glass home). Two euros topped the glass up. The ambiance and the decoration, the great wine and music combined really got everyone in such a good mood it was a joy to be part of, even though yours truly here worked her butt off.

La vie en rosé is alive and well in Cotignac! Photos here from 2017 to entice you all to join us on the 18th July this year 2018.

Cotignac Village House for longterm or holiday let

AVAILABLE FOR LONG TERM RENTAL or 2 nights’ minimum stay from October 1st, 2019…

Please email Susana at provencelivingconsulting@gmail.com to confirm availability and best price! Or if you prefer, you can go to the Airbnb listing (a little more expensive as it will require service fees): https://www.airbnb.fr/rooms/3771828

The house is fully furnished and located in the heart of the gorgeous village of Cotignac, close to all shops and restaurants:

Details of accommodation:
The village house, suitable for one, two couples or a four to five-member- family is just steps away from the centre of the village, but in a quiet neighbourhood (near the outdoor Théùtre du Rocher and the Place de la Mairie), has a new kitchen fully equipped with dining area on the ground floor, a master bedroom (one King size bed) with ensuite shower and toilet as well as a TV on the first floor, an additional bedroom (with 2 single beds that can be used separately or together to make one super king size) with separate bathroom on the second floor, and a large living room (convertible 4-poster futon bed) with bar and kitchenette on the top floor with 3 velux windows for lots of light as well as a TV and DVD player. A mezzanine is just above this floor where there is an additional single sized bed suitable for an older child or adult guest. In total, the house has 124 square metres of living space. Parking can usually be found about 30 metres away, but anyone can perch in front of the house to load/unload. Further parking is located about 150 metres down the road behind the newly restored primary school.

If you are interested in booking this house for your next holiday, please contact Susana directly at provencelivingconsulting@gmail.com or call +33 624 23 26 55. You can also book through AirBnB (site service charges apply): https://www.airbnb.com/rooms/3771828?guests=4&s=pdK7

NB: interior furnishings may change slightly without notice, Maximum capacity 5 adults or 5 adults and one child

The down sides of living in a small rural village in Southern France

We’ve all heard about the joys, the wonders, and the benefits of living in the countryside and particularly in the South of France: the clean air, the abundant warm and sunny days, the cheap delicious wine, the long lunches surrounded by vineyards and olive groves, the fresh local produce and open air markets, the list goes on and on. But if you are looking into living here long term you’ll probably want to know about the down sides too, and better yet, how to avoid them (if possible). My observations and list of negative aspects to living here certainly do not compare to the much longer list of positives and the blessed aspects and are of course relative because they are my personal views based on my own experience of living in this region (PACA) for the last 15 years as an “etrangere.” It should also be noted too that my views stem from being of several nationalities and cultures (American, Japanese, and British)as well as from my age: I am currently 49 years old and live with my French husband and our children who are 9 and 13 years old.

No.1 Lack of jobs. The biggest downside to living in rural Southern France is the lack of jobs available. And the unemployment rates here are very high. In the PACA region the average is currently around 12 to 14 per cent. In Cotignac the rate is as high as 16 per cent according to JDN’s Emploi et chĂŽmage

So if you think you’ll find a job easily here, think again. Unless you are willing to commute long distances and drive over 3 hours every day (to larger cities like Marseille, Toulon, or Nice) you may well find yourself jobless or taking on remenial jobs in the service industry (restaurants and cleaning for example). If you have a teaching qualification English is always popular but public school posts are extremely difficult to come by and private lessons are not so popular for many here who do not make much more than the SMIC (minimum wage) of just over 1,000 euros per month. You would be in luck, however, if your full time job requires that you simply have an internet connection. However this too can cause some problems if you are dependent on high speed connection as most rural villages here are not equipped yet. The current president Macron has pledged to make all of France connected to high speed by the year 2022.  On the otherhand if you like the idea of running a holiday villas rental service/agency, there is always room for that. But it’s no easy business to be in. More on that later in another article.

No. 2  Nothing ever gets done on time. Building work, paper work, dealing with businesses, etc, can test your patience here in the South of France. If you come from the big cities of the West like I did, you’ll find this one especially mind boggling and very frustrating. Getting an immediate response is so rare when it does happen it will make your entire year and you’ll be giddy with happiness. No joke: plumbers, electricians, builders, bankers, painters, etc, seem to have little competition here and often appear aloof and authoritative when you meet them. The French culture has been shaped also by Socialism and we need to remember that the business relations culture also reflects the political ideals. The notion of “customer is king” simply does not exist here. So if you find a good worker, you’ll want to not only keep their contact details to yourself but will find yourself “kissing the ground they walk on” and doing just about anything to keep them reponsive to your calls. It will be you that ends up meeting them at their convenience and not yours. You’ll need to adjust your schedules to fit them in when they say they’ll come ’round.

No. 3 The Small village gossip syndrome. Rural French villages are often small. Cotignac’s current population is 2, 336. Over 60 per cent of the population is above retirement age (65 plus). The active population is around 730. So we’re a small active community. Which means everyone knows everyone’s business, generally speaking. Unless you are anti-social, you will be seen and noticed which means people will talk about you. If someone got married, had a baby, had an accident, gotten divorced, or – and here’s the worst – caused a scandal involving breakups of families, you’ll hear about it.  If you caused the scandal, you’ll be shamed. So if you’re addicted to drama, it’s best to stay in a large city where anonymity may save some face. In the small villages (and this is probably true anywhere in the world) life can feel a little suffocating when someone asks you about your friends’ recent car accident or someone else’s husband running off with the babysitter or why you think so-and-so jumped off a bridge. And that is if the stories are even true. Sometimes rumours spread that destroy reputations and cause people to move to another village or as far as another country. Of course this happens everywhere but in a village where you hear about it so often it feels like it’s constant. So a good rule of thumb to follow is that if you don’t want people to know about something just don’t talk about it – to anyone.

No. 4 You need a car. If you’re like me and need to feed a family you’ll need to stock up on groceries which means driving to the supermarkets. The closest to Cotignac is the SPAR on the route de Brignoles. But that is still 4 kilometres away from the village centre. There is a small convenience store on the Cours but you don’t want to carry heavy bags back up a hill every other day (although there is a delivery service if you call ahead). So a minimum-weekly-visit to the larger supermarkets (like E.Leclerc, IntermachĂ©, Hyper U or Casino) needs driving to. The largest shopping mall is in Brignoles (20 kms) and for a big selection or department store you’ll need to go as far as Toulon La Valette (63 kms). Public transportation to these places are poorly scheduled and slow. If you like your life to be surrounded by conveniences and you do not like to drive, a rural village in Southern France is not the place for you. On the other hand the internet is a great place to shop and just about anyone can receive just about anything by post these days. And this has been a god-send to me!

No. 5 Winters are cold. Now, if you come from places like Canada, Scandinavia, or anywhere north of France you’ll laugh at this but it’s not so much the temperatures here that get cold (Cotignac can get as low as minus 8 degrees) but the majority of houses that are ill equipped to keep you warm enough in them. Many houses are not sufficiently insulated and often electric heaters do not provide enough relief or consume so much that electric bills become no longer affordable. Oil is another popular method of radiator heating but unless the house is new or has been properly restored and updated to modern standards (most old village houses are over 300 years old) it can also be cost prohibitive. Newer houses could be equipped with heat pumps (minimum 15K euros) or with considerable investment geothermal energy can be tapped but this is reserved for those with very big budgets. Many people use wood burning stoves here which can heat small spaces well but needs constant attention (and clean up once a day). You’ll also need to order your wood which gets delivered but then dumped in a big mountain in front of your doorstep and if that’s blocking traffic in anyway you’ll have to very quickly stack it in a safe dry place so let’s hope you have the stamina and energy! Heating is needed from around the end of October to end of April and maybe longer if your house is not South-facing.

No. 6 Most shops are closed Mondays, Wednesday afternoons and Sundays. They are also more often closed for lunch between 12 and 3 or even 4pm during their open days. Sometimes it seems nothing is open on Mondays; not banks, not restaurants, not even hairdressers. And that’s just routine around here. The only really safe days to go shopping in the village are Tuesdays (it’s also our market day) and Thursdays. It’s worse in the Winter time and some shops and restaurants close their doors for the entire season.

No. 7 Locals are hard to get to know. I found that it took me about an average of 18 months before I finally got invited over to dinner at my first local friend’s house. Rural French people just take a long time to get to know. They are very discrete and not trusting at first but with perseverance and grit, you’ll be accepted into their hearts. Once they let you in, they tend to be very loyal and warm and will be there to help when you need them the most. And that is something worth its weight in gold and something you cannot live without here in the countryside. If you get invited over to a local French couples’ or family meal, don’t forget to bring them a nice bottle of wine (make it one of quality, nothing cheap) and expect to spend a good 4 hours chatting while dining slowly. Invitation meals are never rushed.

No. 8 Participate in associations. Local associations provide entertainment throughout the year for any village in France but they are also an important source of information and social gatherings for networking. It’s through an association that you’ll meet people on the local council, the mayor, and the various individuals that make the village work all year ’round. Cotignac has a larger than average number of associations that keep locals and tourists busy all year by organising events such as concerts, theatre productions, festivals (the Quince festival in October for example), Christmas markets, feasts, parties, balls, artist expositions, museums, cinema, music lessons, sports activities and popular events like the annual Trail Race in June. Participating in an association is easy. Just contact the president of the association of your choice and let them know you wish to participate. There is a list of associations for Cotignac here. You will be invited to their next meeting and participate in the organisation of their next event. And you’ll make lots of new friends in the process. The downside of this though is that you really do need to commit your time and energy and participate with the association for the entire year at the least. You’ll be frowned upon if you give up mid-way. And remember you’ll be talked about so you need to stay on your best behaviour!

Having said all that, I still love it here and would not dream of living anywhere else.

🙂 Susana

 

 

 

 

Brocante versus Vide Grenier

Tourists often confuse these two outdoor sales events but basically a Brocante is run by professionals and a Vide Grenier by either a local municipality and/or an association.

At a Brocante one can typically find lots of antiques in the form of cutlery, decoration, furniture, and jewelry. You’ll also find art in the form of sculptures, framed paintings, old posters, and textiles. The people behind the stands are professional buyer-sellers who spend much of their time collecting and then selling their treasured items at regular brocante markets around the region. Some travel from as far away as the North of France. My personal experience in shopping at Brocantes is that they often over-price items but if you tell the seller you are local and that you’d like to negotiate the price, they are mostly open to this.  It helps if your French is very good, of course. Continue reading Brocante versus Vide Grenier

Falaise des Arts – Spring expo at the Centre d’art la falaise

There’s a new exposition in town and it opened today at the Centre d’Art La Falaise, in Cotignac. The current collection features regional fine artists, sculptors and photographers (in alphabetical order): Elian Bachini, Jean Marie Cartereau, Chantal Casefont, Martine Doll, Michel Dufresne, Alain Francois, Vonick Laubreton, StĂ©phane Lovighi-Brougogne, Manuel Pontarelli, Eric Principaud and Carla Van Der Werf.

The centre is a beautiful renovated old chapel and was once a cinema from the 1930s until the early ’60s.  It was then turned into a restaurant until ten years ago when it became a garage until Mirabeau Wine turned the lower floor into its headquarters and boutique two years ago.  Anyone can enter the Centre d’Art on the first floor for a very reasonable fee of just two euros, benefiting the privately run non-profit foundation.  If you are a local or live here most of the year, I highly recommend getting a “Pass PrivilĂšge” for just 5 euros with access to all the expositions (not counting other events such as concerts or conferences) throughout the year. For more information and announcements, follow their facebook page here.

Opening hours from 15th April – 14th May: Tuesdays and Fridays  10h00-12h30 15h00-17h30, Thursdays (from 27th April) 10h – 12h30 and
weekends (Saturdays and Sundays):
11h00-12h30 & 15h00-17:30

-mardi – 10h à 12h30
– jeudi – 10h à 12h30

– vendredi – 10h à 12h30 et 15h à 17h30
– samedi – 11h Ă  12h30 et 15h à 17h30

– dimanche – 11h à 12h30 et 15h Ă  17h30

Follow their facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/centredartlafalaise/?fref=ts

 

Le Mas de Cotignac – accommodation and table d’hĂŽtes

Recently written up in our local newspaper the Var Matin, Le Mas de Cotignac offers Michelin standard “voluptuous” accommodation for even the fussiest of guests. If you are looking for a romantic break, a tranquil vacation, or a weekend getaway without the kids, this is the place to unwind and be luxuriously pampered.  They are located just outside the village. Le Mas de Cotignac is an exceptional bed and breakfast with table d’hĂŽtes (possibility to book lunches and dinners) with swimming pool and jacuzzi.  And their service is also top notch and attentive to guests’ every need. Continue reading Le Mas de Cotignac – accommodation and table d’hĂŽtes

Cotignac’s circuit walk revisited

Cotignac’s circuit walk is fun to do at any time of the year but it’s particularly pretty in the early Fall when the fruit is ripe for picking and the tourist crowds have gone.  The temperatures are much cooler at this time too, making it a joy, rather than a pain, to walk in the sun. Count on taking about 45 – 55 minutes (leisurely) or 30 minutes (sport/fast walking). The walk is suitable for moderately fit to fit walkers but not suitable for the disabled or unfit elderly. Continue reading Cotignac’s circuit walk revisited

Cotignac in black and white

Black and white photos do something to an image that I really love, particularly when a lot of sunlight is in them: shadows are more pronounced, skies look more mysterious and the photos allow the viewer to  see different aspects of the subject at hand.  Time seems to stop and the monochrome world somehow appears less busy, more calm, and with fewer flaws. Many of these photos capture images of buildings that most likely looked exactly the same several hundreds of years ago.  Cotignac is an exceptionally beautiful village in the Var department of France and I find something every day to photograph here that makes my heart skip a beat. – Susana